Venice is known for its traditional wine bar and cicchetti dishes. A cicchetti is a small snack that’s typically served with a glass of wine, tapas-style. Small sandwiches, olives, etc. are all common food served as cicchetti. Vineria all’Amarone is a restaurant / wine bar in Venice, however this isn’t one of the traditional cicchetti bars. The reason why I selected this place is because of its wide selection of wines, both for consumption at the restaurant and for purchase (there is a wine shop right next to the restaurant). To me, the chance to taste and purchase Amarone and other Valpolicella wines is an opportunity not to be missed because of Venice’s proximity Valpolicella.

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After finishing a bottle, a wine hang tag was given to us to leave the restaurant a short message. These empty bottles with customers’ notes from all over the world were displayed on the shelves. That is certainly a great way to make diners feel special and appreciated.

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The Greek salad was fresh and tasty, with a generous portion size.

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The charcuterie platter was a bit disappointing with only three types of meat. Mediocre dish.

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Cured fish and octopus were not much better in comparison to the charcuterie platter. They were sliced so thinly that it was like eating a piece of paper.

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Although I am not a big pizza fan, however in comparison to the above, this came as a better choice. The pizza was baked fresh so it came out hot and crunchy.

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Classic spaghetti and meatball. Decent, standard but unremarkable.

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What made All’Amarone memorable for me was definitely the wines and not the food. Markup is merely an additional 30% for consuming in the restaurant vs. purchasing from the store next door. From where I am from, Toronto, where wines markups typically range from a shameful 200% to 300%, this was a dream come true.

This Valpolicella Ripasso was at the peak of its life, just the right time to be consumed. Dried prunes combined with hints of seductive tertiary aromas of barnyard, leather and earthiness, very enjoyable. Ripasso wine is made by adding semi-dried grapes (usually leftovers grapes of an Amarone) to a base wine to activate a second fermentation. In terms of body and weight, a Ripasso is in the middle when compared to a light Valpolicella and a powerful Amarone.

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Allegrini is a very old but well known family-owned winery in Fumane, Valpolicella. I was around the area for half a day but sadly did not get a chance to visit them. This La Grola wine is made with 80% Corvina , 10% Syrah, and 10% Oseleta. An interesting fact that I learned while visiting Valpolicella is that there is a lot of renewed interest in Oseleta, a local indigenous grape Valpolicella. Deep ruby in color, the wine displayed intense aromas of berries and smokiness. Not befitting the regulations of a DOCG or DOC wine, this wine was categorized as an IGT Veronese. IGT was an Italian wine quality tier introduced in 1992 to grant winemakers certain degree of freedom to experiment. IGT wines’ main focus is to express the region of origin rather than focusing on grape varieties.

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Most Recommended: All’Amarone’s wines selection.

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Suggestions for improvements:

  1. Most items on the menu are uneventful, especially the charcuterie platter.
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